This is not the whole newspaper, but a special complimentary, on-line edition of the general-interest, periodic newsmagazine, Continental Newstime.  The rest of the newspaper includes national and world news, newsmaker profiles, commentary/analysis, periodic interviews, travel and entertainment features, an intermittent science column, humor, sports, cartoons, comic strips, and puzzles, and averages 26 pages per month.  Continental Features/Continental News Service publishes, on a monthly rotational basis, special, complimentary on-line newspapers: Washington DC News Edition (familiarly knownasthe Malfunction Junction News Edition or Snooze Junction News Edition), Chicago News Edition, Honolulu News Edition, Atlanta News Edition, Anchorage News Edition, Boston News Edition, Seattle News Edition, Miami News Edition, San Diego News Edition, Rochester (N.Y.) News Edition, Minneapolis News Edition, and Houston News Edition. 

Atlanta News Edition of Continental Newstime 
Editor-in-Chief: Gary P. Salamone
Continental Features/Continental News Service 
501 W. Broadway, Plaza A, PMB# 265

San Diego, CA 92101
(858) 492-8696
E-mail: info@continentalnewsservice.com


* Congressional News Briefs ... Senator Jon Ossoff announces that he seeks inclusion, within the Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Act (Senate Bill 915), of his proposal that funding be provided to replace lead pipes in Georgia's public schools and public schools across the country, because Georgia numbers among the 23 states that received an "F' in the U.S. Public Interest Research Group study, "Get the Lead Out" for not adequately protecting students from lead in drinking water.   While the legislation has been before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, the Senator has sought to convince Committee Chairman Tom Carper that the need to reduce lead exposure for children should not be overlooked.   The State of Georgia itself, on the basis of testing 800 schools for lead in drinking water, projects that high lead levels likely exist in hundreds of faucets in the state's public schools.   Senator Ossoff notes that' the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not only determined that there is no safe level of lead exposure for children, but that exposure to lead can slow child development, cause behavior and hearing problems, and result in lasting kidney and brain damage.  The Senator reports, as well, that, during a Homeland Security Committee confirmation hearing, he obtained pledges from President Joseph Biden's three nominees to the U.S. Postal Service Board of Governors that they would visit Georgia to investigate mail delays that have adversely affected Georgians depending upon delivery of prescription medicines, mail orders, and small-business sales orders.   On his part, Senator Raphael Warnock is among a group of Senate colleagues that has pressed the U.S. Justice Department for transparency concerning its funding of predictive-policing algorithms by law enforcement nation-wide, citing reports that reliance on the algorithms tends to "amplify" existing biases regarding where criminal conduct can be expected and who is likely to engage in criminal conduct.   Characterizing predictive-policing programs as unproven so far, the Senator, together with Senators Ron Widen, Elizabeth Warren, and Edward Markey, among other Members of Congress, has requested evidence from the Attorney-General showing whether these programs actually reduce crime, because, short of such evidence of effectiveness, criminal-justice experts warn that employing policing algorithms based upon flawed law-enforcement data can perpetuate discriminatory policing against Black Americans and other marginalized demographic groups in society.   Then, too, during a meeting of the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Committee on the Growing Climate Solutions Act, Senator Warnock emphasized the importance of ongoing engagement with farmers of color on decisions that affect their livelihoods and offer new revenue streams for farmers.

* State Government News Briefs... Governor Brian P. Kemp has called attention to significant job-creation and economic-development projects in the Atlanta metropolitan area and in Lowndes County.   Regarding the first-mentioned project, a global leader in Al-enabled software and robotics, GreyOrange is investing in excess of $1 million to relocate its global headquarters to Atlanta Metro and estimates that this will create 200 jobs.  Also, the Mexican multi-national firm, Grupo Bimbo, plans to invest more than $25 million through its subsidiary, Bimbo QSR to open a food-processing plant in Valdosta, destined to create 74 jobs.  Besides, the electric cooperative, Middle Georgia EMC is coordinating with Conexon Connect to deploy a 1,900-mile, fiber-to-the-home network to furnish high-speed Internet access to customers in seven central Georgia counties, with the first customers due to receive the service as early as the first quarter of 2022.  In addition, the Governor has made a number of appointments, including appointment of Brigadier-General Bobby Christine, the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Georgia, as Columbia County District Attorney. And consistent with the Georgia Code, the Governor has noted the formation of the Nominating Committee for Georgia's Child Advocate, which will review applications received from May 3 through May 7 at 5 PM and recommend three or more candidates for Governor Kemp's consideration.  The Child Advocate appointed will succeed Rachel Davidson, who relocated to another position.

* County Government News Briefs ... The Fulton County Board  of Commissioners, when it last conducted business on April 21, was poised to appoint or re-appoint a member to the County Citizens Commission on the Environment and a member to the Commission on Disability Affairs; to

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request approval of cooperative purchasing with the Department of Community Development, City of Santa Monica, California, in an amount not exceeding $248,019.51 with Pathways Community Network to manage and provide assistance to the County Continuum of Care's Homeless Management Information System; consider authorization of an application for a $24,000 grant from the University of Georgia School of Public & International Affairs for the Fulton County Restorative Justice Summer Internship Program; to hear a presentation from the County Manager on the COVID-19 Operational Response and on approval of a Resolution extending emergency purchasing authority; to take up a request to amend the County Library System's contract for Program Management Services with CBRE Heery/Russell, in the amount of $492,246.81, extending the contract term through December 31,2021 and including completion of renovation of the leased Peachtree Library and MLK Library, as well as added work at the Central Library; and to discuss the Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. CEO Report.

* City Government News Briefs ... Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms informs that, since license-plate reading cameras help the Atlanta Police Department to solve crimes quickly, the City Council will take up a Resolution from Council Member J.P. Matjigkeit to accept a donation of more of the cameras, which are manufactured by Atlanta-based Flock Safety, and to deploy them across the City as part of the public-safety, Operation Shield network.   The Mayor adds that the Department plans to increase police presence on Atlanta streets during the next 12 months and that this aligns with her community-policing strategy.    Further, the City Department of Transportation has collaborated with Georgia Tech industrial-engineering students to identify areas where street lights can be added to reduce crime and vehicle crashes.   In particular, the City is committed to equalizing lighting in the under-served area of Southwest Atlanta.**   Also, near the end of last month, the Mayor's Administration, having completed an inventory of public land that can be dedicated to affordable housing, has asked the City Council's Community Development and Human Services Committee to consider development of single-family housing, with accessory-dwelling units, on three lots and mixed-use, infill housing with Invest Atlanta on a fourth property.   Atlanta Housing and the Metro Atlanta Land Bank are members, too, of an inter-agency advisory council the Mayor established by Administrative Order to consider more public land for affordable-housing development.    In other developments, the Mayor has re-issued coronavirus-related Administrative Orders barring the Department of Watershed Management, through May 31, 2021, from terminating water service to any customer due to nonpayment and barring the Chief Financial Officer, through June 30, 2021, from citing or imposing penalties on any individual or business subject to taxation in accordance with Chapter 30, Article III for tax obligations delinquent after April 1, 2020.   And the next meeting of the City Council is set for May 3, at which time the Council will consider a Resolution by Michael Julian Bond for creation of a joint City-County Committee to assist the Fulton County Sheriff in dealing with overcrowding at the County Jail and at which tune the Council is scheduled to approve a Consent Agenda including an Ordinance amending the 2021 fiscal-year Airport Passenger Facility Charge Fund Budget through transfer from appropriations of $40 million to various projects at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.  **This is part of the Mayor's "One Atlanta—Light Up the Night initiative to increase the City's streetlight footprint by 10,000 lights.

* School District News Briefs ... Superintendent Dr. Lisa Herring announces that Georgia Milestones testing for grades 3 through 8 is in progress through May 18 and that the Career, Technical and Agricultural Education End-of-Pathway Assessments retest is planned for grades 9 through 12 from May 3 through May 7 and that Advanced Placement exams will span the period May 18-May 28.   Meantime, the Board of Education, chaired by Jason F. Esteves, has planned a meeting, with Budget Hearing, for May 3.

* Weather... The National Weather Service reports that current conditions at Fulton County Airport-Brown Field, as of 11:53 PM on April 30, are fair, with a temperature of 64 degrees Fahrenheit, relative humidity of 48 percent, wind out of the northwest at 7 miles per hour, barometric pressure of 30.05 inches, a dewpoint of 44 degrees, and visibility of 10 miles. The forecast for tonight calls for mostly-clear skies, with an over-night low temperature of about 54 degrees and north wind of about 5 miles per hour.   Saturday, May 1 is expected to be sunny, with a daily high temperature of about 79 degrees and north wind of about 5 miles per hour becoming southeasterly in the afternoon.   It is anticipated that Saturday night will be mostly clear, with a low temperature of around 57 degrees and southwest wind of about 5 miles per hour becoming calm.   Sunday, look for a 20-percent chance of showers after 2 PM, with mostly-cloudy skies, a daily high temperature of close to 81 degrees, south wind of 5 to 10 miles per hour and gusts as high as 15 miles per hour.
 
* Sports ... In the NBA, the Hawks (34-30) have won 5 of their last 10 games and attempt to overcome a losing streak—extended to 3 games with a 126-104 loss to the hard-charging 76ers on Friday—when they host the Bulls (26-37) today at 8 PM.   Over in Major League Soccer, Atlanta United FC is among three Eastern Conference teams sporting 4 points in two games and hosts Conference rival, New England today at 4 PM.   Meanwhile, the Braves (12-14), coming off a 13-5 loss to the Blue Jays on Friday, send Charlie Morton (2-1) against the Jays' Travis Bergen (0-0) today at 7:37 PM.



 


Please E-mail info@continentalnewsservice.com for a copy of Mitch Schwenke and Alex Avedikian's cartoon feature, "It Could Happen to Hugh!"  Thank you. 

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* Proverbs (chapter 28/verse 22): “He that hastes to be rich has an evil eye, and considers not that poverty shall come upon him.”   hastes=hurries.
[A timely warning against get-rich-quick schemes]


















A free copy of the Etna, California News Edition of Continental Newstime [dated August 14, 2020] containing the newspaper feature of outdoor writer Lee Snyder is also available by

E-mail request ​to info@continentalnewsservice.com


*Free


Tulelake, CA News Edition 

of Continental Newstime  newsmagazine

VOLUME I                                            NUMBER 1                                   OCTOBER 12, 2020
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                                                                                                                                                  What's new in Tulelake, California? Find out here:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This is a Special Issue designed only to encourage a would-be editor-publisher in Tulelake, California to start a regular weekly or bi-weekly newspaper and to show that, using the structured format below, the proverbial wheel need not be re-invented—to eliminate the complexity in restoring newspaper coverage to Tulelake, California.  Just as our Website indicates, Continental Features/Continental News Service is available to give guidance, to offer some cartoons/comic strips and other feature material free of charge, and to help a new local editor-publisher expand by 26 pages one time monthly for readers interested in receiving a general-interest magazine insert. CF/CNS desires more exposure for our cartoons, comic strips and newspaper columns, but we do not exist to compete with a local editor-publisher in Tulelake, California.  We publish too many other newspapers and publications to regularly publish a Tulelake community newspaper, too.  It is our hope, besides, that a local editor-publisher in Tulelake will not neglect to publish ads, so local businesses receive wider publicity for their products and services.  Thank you.


Tulelake, CA News Edition of Continental Newstime 
Continental Features/Continental News Service 
501 W. Broadway, Plaza A, PMB# 265 
San Diego, CA 92101 
(858) 492-8696  
E-mail:  info@continentalnewsservice.com  


* Congressional News Briefs …  The Paycheck Protection Program ended on August 8, with about $135 billion in Program reserves unspent, and Tulelake’s agent in the U.S. House of Representatives, Doug LaMalfa, considering the initiative a success, insofar as it reportedly preserved about 51 million jobs--12 million of which were located in rural areas--has signed a petition requiring 218 House Member signatures, to bring this matter up for consideration on the House floor.  The thrust of the associated bill, House bill 8265, is to qualify businesses for a second Program loan if they can show a reduction in revenue, to relax spending requirements, and to enable businesses--Congressman LaMalfa has small Northern California businesses in mind--to claim loan forgiveness.  LaMalfa expresses disappointment that, as more businesses close for good and could make use of the already-authorized aid, amid an active wildfire season, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has blocked Congress from addressing small-business needs.  Also, the California Representative informs that he helped draft legislation the House passed to revise the 2018 Water Resources Development Act to offer relief to Klamath Basin farmers and ranchers that suffered water shutoffs threatening to the Basin economy.  The bill permits the Bureau of Reclamation to earmark as much as $10 million annually for conservation and water-efficiency measures and authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to exercise greater flexibility in meeting the needs of water users and to protect duck populations in the Klamath National Wildlife Refuge from drought, as well.  Since the U.S. Senate has already passed the bill, LaMalfa trusts that, President Donald Trump, given his commitment to aiding Basin farmers and ranchers, will  sign the bill into law.  Commenting on House Bill 925, a $2.4-trillion, supposed coronavirus-spending package, which he characterizes as the Speaker's "partisan wish list" because it was written without opportunity for Republican participation and contains much irrelevant to the coronavirus, Congressman LaMalfa says his vote against the proposal owed, in part, to the Democrat leader's attempt "to prop up the vulnerable members of her party headed into Election Day."  The GOP Congressman's objections to the bill center on its tendency "to fund dangerous programs, like letting felons out of prison, providing stimulus checks to illegal immigrants, de-funding police, and federalizing the electoral process."  In particular, he mentions removal of $600 million for COPS Hiring and state and local law-enforcement aid, opening a loophole for Planned Parenthood to receive taxpayer money under the Paycheck Protection Program, dispensing with ID requirements for in-person voting, eliminating the limitations on State and Local Tax (SALT) deductibility, and, among other demerits, stripping the Food Stamp program of its work-incentive provisions.  California Senator Dianne Feinstein, together with Virginia Senators Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, concede that, from the beginning of the Military Housing Privatization Initiative in 1996, Congress and the Defense Department expressed too much confidence in the private firms administering the program; namely, through such features as 50-year leases between the companies and the service branches.  The National Defense Authorization Act in the 2020 fiscal-year addressed health, safety and environmental hazards in the private military housing, and, in keeping with the Act, the Defense Department announced an 18-point Tenant Bill of Rights during February, 2020.  Still, the Senators note, four of the required rights have yet to be extended, since there is no standard lease, no tenant access to the housing unit's maintenance history, no mechanism for withholding the Basic Allowance for Housing when a dispute between company and tenant occurs, and no process for resolution of disputes.  Toward greater oversight by Congress and the Defense Department, the California Senator and her colleagues have introduced the Ensuring Safe Housing for Our Military Act (Senate Bill 703) and have requested a progress report on the Tenant Bill of Rights from Defense Secretary Mark Esper.  Then, too, the Senator, along with all Judiciary Committee Democrats, argue that a Senate hearing on Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett "would endanger health, safety."  They add, "Now is the time to provide much-needed COVID relief, not to rush through a Supreme Court nomination and further endanger health and safety."  In their letter to Chairman Lindsey Graham, they oppose a remote hearing on the nomination, too.

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* State Government News Briefs … Tulelake’s representative in the California Senate, Brian Dahle, has announced his opposition to a measure passed by the California Legislature that would extend and re-direct until 2051 the utility tax ratepayers now pay.  He is critical, besides, of Assembly Bill 1788, saying that the state has established many pesticide regulations, but fails to pursue those who use rodenticides and other pesticides illegally or negligently.  Moreover, remarking on Governor Gavin Newsom's long-range plan to ban gasoline-powered cars from the state's roads, he points out that the state cannot even ensure dependable electricity, much less power electric cars.  In an appraisal of the legislative session, the Governor has announced vetoing an additional 16 bills, including Assembly Bill 1835 because it would require the California Board of Education to undertake a lengthy rule-making process to amend the Local Control Funding Formula and delay use of unspent supplemental and concentration grant funds to benefit the most-vulnerable students for two school-years.  The Governor favors a January budget solution, instead.  He cited, as accomplishments, imposition of a ban on a number of toxic chemicals in cosmetic products, establishment of the state's own generic drug label (Cal Rx) as a means of lowering prescription-drug prices, creation of a task force to look into reparations for slavery, expansion of paid sick leave and family leave for front-line workers, and passage of new eviction and foreclosure-protection legislation for those confronted with a loss of housing due to the economic effects of the coronavirus.

* County Government News Briefs …  The Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors, at its meeting of October 6, was poised to take up a Consent Agenda consisting of approval of a letter to President Donald Trump asking for federal aid to counties affected by wildfire and the coronavirus public-health emergency; authorization to apply for and accept a California Library Literacy Services grant in the amount of $56,000; approval of a 2020-2021 fiscal-year contract with the First 5 Siskiyou Children & Families Commission, in an amount not greater than $30,000, to furnish mental-health services and outreach to youth aged 0 to 5; adoption of a Resolution authorizing acceptance of a CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act 2020 Emerging Issues Project allocation award of $166,978 for adjusting community-mitigation responses to the coronavirus in the County, through March 23, 2022; and, among other items, adoption of a Resolution okaying the submission of application(s) for Per Capita Grant Funds through the California Department of Parks and Recreation.  Under Departmental Requests, newly-appointed Sheriff-Coroner Jeremiah LaRue was to be sworn in, and consideration was to be given to an Urgency Ordinance amending the County Code on standards for wells, with a Public Hearing scheduled for the Second Reading of the Ordinance. With regard to appointments, County Supervisors were set to appoint one Delegate and an Alternate to serve on the California State Association of Counties Board of Directors for the 2020-2021 Association year.

* City Government News Briefs ... The City Council, at a conference-call Special Meeting on October 8, was set to take up an agenda providing for approval of the Minutes of its Special Meeting on September 15 and its Regular Meeting on that date, along with approval of bill payments,  and to receive public comments. [The Regular Meeting on September 15 dealt with the matter of authorization to apply for a LEAP (Local Early Action Planning) grant in the amount of $65,000 for re-zoning, updating planning documents, ordinances, and housing elements before the January 31, 2021 deadline; consideration of a possible change of ownership to the City of the Clyde Hotel and associated grant opportunities; possible acceptance of a construction bid on the Veterans Park Expansion Project; and, among other items of business, approval of a contract for on-call  Engineering Services. The Special Meeting took up the matter of Police Officer appointments in Closed Session and considered approval of a professional-services agreement with Jesse Small to perform artistic services in connection with the Veterans Park Expansion Project.]  In addition, time was scheduled for delivery of reports from community and/or school representatives; for authorization to pursue funding to cover the deficiency preventing initiation of the Veterans Park Expansion Project; for discussion, toward approval, of the proposed valued engineering contract suggested by the Director of Public Works;  and for permission for the City Hall Administrator to advertise for the Temporary City Staff/Library position.  The subsequent Closed Session of the Council, over which Mayor Henry Ebinger was to preside, was tasked to discuss a citizen complaint against the City Hall Administrator concerning payment of a utility bill and  cumulative fees, while a succeeding Closed Council Session was concerned with Performance Evaluations of all City Department Heads.  Thereafter, Department Heads were allotted time to furnish updates on matters relating to their areas of responsibility, and comments from such City officials as the City Engineer, the Chief of Police, the Director of Public Works, the City Clerk, the City Treasurer, and Council Members (Gary Fensler, Richard Marcillac, Penny Velador, and Henry Ebinger) were entertained.

* Weather ...  The National Weather Service reports that, as of 1:05 AM, current conditions at Klamath Falls International Airport are mostly cloudy, with a temperature of 48 degrees Fahrenheit, relative humidity of 70 percent, wind out of the south at 6 miles per hour, barometric pressure of 30.23 inches, a dewpoint of 39 degrees, and visibility of 10 miles.  The over-night forecast for Tulelake calls for partly-cloudy skies, with a light west wind and a low temperature of about 33 degrees.  Columbus Day is expected to be mostly sunny, with light and variable wind becoming westerly at 6 to 11 miles per hour in the afternoon and with a daily high temperature of about 64 degrees.  Monday night is expected to be mostly clear, with a low temperature of about 33 degrees and west-northwest wind of 5 to 10 miles per hour becoming light and variable in the evening, while the forecast for Tuesday calls for mostly-sunny skies, a daily high temperature near 70 degrees, and light and variable wind becoming westerly at 5 to 10 miles per hour in the afternoon.  

 

 

 

                                                                                   Please E-mail info@continentalnewsservice.com for a copy of Cliff Ulmer's cartoon feature, Brother Jones.

 

 

 

 


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VOLUME VIII        NUMBER 1          MAY 1, 2021

 Atlanta News Edition

of Continental Newstime  newsmagazine 

Continental Features/Continental News Service

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