This is not the whole newspaper, but a special complimentary, on-line edition of the general-interest, periodic newsmagazine, Continental Newstime.  The rest of the newspaper includes national and world news, newsmaker profiles, commentary/analysis, periodic interviews, travel and entertainment features, an intermittent science column, humor, sports, cartoons, comic strips, and puzzles, and averages 26 pages per month.  Continental Features/Continental News Service publishes, on a monthly rotational basis, special, complimentary on-line newspapers: Washington DC News Edition (familiarly knownasthe Malfunction Junction News Edition or Snooze Junction News Edition), Chicago News Edition, Honolulu News Edition, Atlanta News Edition, Anchorage News Edition, Boston News Edition, Seattle News Edition, Miami News Edition, San Diego News Edition, Rochester (N.Y.) News Edition, Minneapolis News Edition, and Houston News Edition. 

Minneapolis News Edition of Continental Newstime 
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* Congressional News Briefs ... Senator Tina Smith has announced opposition to President Donald Trump's decision to nominate Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court, saying what disqualifies Barrett is her opposition to abortion and Obamacare.  At the same time the Senator says that we "need Supreme Court Justices who will protect the rights of all Americans, and deliver equal justice for all."  Senator Amy Klobuchar concurring, has announced another collaboration with Senator Smith, one which supports the Economic Development Administration's decision to award $3,161,976 to the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians for construction of a Business Incubation Center.  Asserting that "Native communities have been disproportionately impacted by the economic and public-health crises caused by the coronavirus pandemic," Senator Klobuchar notes that the award is designed to preserve 87 jobs, create 217 jobs and build upon $7.2 million in private investment.  In addition, Klobuchar underscores that, since small, independent, live-music and entertainment venues were the first to close under coronavirus measures and face an estimated ticket-sales loss of $9 billion if they are not allowed to re-open before 2021, she and Texas Republican Senator John Cornyn have drawn 42 Senate co-sponsors and 134 House co-sponsors to support their Save our Stages Bill, to offer those venues $10 billion in grants to pay employees and sustain the businesses of promoters, venue operators, and booking agents.  These provisions have also been included in the Heroes Act authored in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Then, too, Senator Klobuchar and Hawaii Senator Brian Schatz have joined with Colorado Senator Michael Bennet to push for passage of The Future of Local News Commission Bill, which is a response to the struggle of local-news organizations to weather the coronavirus effects and the movement to digital media.


* State Government News Briefs ... Governor Tim Walz has recently made appointments to the Minnesota Sentencing Guidelines Commission (Kyra Ladd), the Board of the Perpich Center for Arts Education (Molly Chase of Minneapolis), the Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board (Tim Malchow), the Minnesota Forest Resources Council (Kory Cease), the Governor's Children's Cabinet Advisory Council (Salma Abdi), the Minnesota Board of Nursing (Latasha Lee of Minneapolis).  The terms of these appointees expire either in 2022, 2023, or 2024.


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* County Government News Briefs ...  The Hennepin County Board of Commissioners is due to hold Committee meetings on October 6 beginning at 1:30 PM, and, if a Legal Briefing is required, it will have met in Closed Session hours earlier at 10:30 AM.  On October 8, a Board Briefing is scheduled for 10 AM.  The Regional Railroad Authority Board had conducted business on September 29 to take up a Resolution encompassing a proposed property-tax levy and budget, just as the Housing and Redevelopment Authority Board on the same day met to consider a Resolution adopting a proposed property-tax levy and budget.  And County Administrator David Hough has presented County Commissioners with a 2021 budget proposal shaving off more than $300 million in spending, yielding $2.2 billion in budget authority.

* City Government News Briefs ... The Minneapolis City Council announces that a meeting of the Northside Green Zone Task Force is slated for today at 4 PM, with the Zoning Board of Adjustment poised to conduct business at 4:30 PM, and that the Council is set to assemble electronically again tomorrow at 9:30 AM.  Then, on October 5, starting at 2 PM, the Food Council Executive Committee (Homegrown Minneapolis Executive Committee) plans an on-line meeting.


* School District News Briefs ... The Board of Education of the Minneapolis Public Schools District is set to meet beginning at 5:30 PM on October 13 in the Assembly Room of the Davis Center (1250 West Broadway Avenue), and there will be a half hour of Public Comment available.  Then, on October 20 at 5 PM, the Finance Committee plans to meet, and on October 27 at 4:30 PM a Policy Committee meeting is scheduled.


* Weather ...  The National Weather Service reports that current conditions at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, as of 4:53 PM on September 30, are mostly cloudy and breezy, with a temperature of 62 degrees Fahrenheit, relative humidity of 41 percent, wind out of the northwest at 22 miles per hour--with gusts as high as 39 miles per hour--barometric pressure of 29.82 inches, a dewpoint of 38 degrees, and visibility of 10 miles.  The forecast for this afternoon calls for scattered showers, mostly-cloudy skies, a daily high temperature of about 62 degrees, breezy conditions, northwest wind of about 20 miles per hour, gusts as high as 25 miles per hour, and a 30-percent chance of precipitation.  Tonight, showers are likely, mostly before 8 PM, with mostly-cloudy skies, a low temperature of about 46 degrees, northwest wind of 10 to 15 miles per hour, gusts as high as 25 miles per hour, and a 60-percent chance of precipitation.  Tomorrow, scattered showers are expected, mainly before 8 AM, with mostly-cloudy skies, a daily high temperature of about 53 degrees, north-northwest wind of about 15 miles per hour, and a 30-percent chance of precipitation.  Thursday night, partly-cloudy skies are anticipated, with a low temperature of about 36 degrees, and north-northwest wind of 5 to 10 miles per hour.  On Friday, areas of frost are forecast before 9 AM, but partly-sunny skies are otherwise expected, with a high temperature of about 49 degrees, and calm conditions becoming wind out of the northwest at about 5 miles per hour.


* Sports News Briefs ... The Vikings seek their first win in the new NFL season when they visit the Houston Texans (0-3) on Sunday.  In Major League Soccer, Minnesota United FC (19 total points) plays FC Cincinnati (13 total points) on Saturday.


Travelers Checks by Ann Hattes                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      (Condensed and reprinted from 2018)

Travel from your armchair to Belgium during WWI in this year marking the 100th anniversary of World War I, the war to end all wars. In the narrative non-fiction historical book, WWI CRUSADERS (Milbrown Press), Jeffrey B. Miller writes of a little-known humanitarian rescue mission, led by a future American President. Few have heard of the American-led CRB, Commission for Relief in Belgium. But for nearly 10 million Belgians and Northern French facing imminent starvation behind German lines, the CRB was life-saving, responsible for initiating, organizing, and supervising the largest food relief the world had ever seen. Realizing Americans were in the dark about this incredible humanitarian chapter of U.S. history, Miller has created a thoroughly-researched telling of this massive American relief effort, while also bringing attention to Herbert Hoover's role in the food-relief effort, during and after the war. Learn about the staggering obstacles of establishing and maintaining relief for nearly 10 million, all behind the German trenches. Find out who the humanitarian crusaders actually were and their passion for service and relief. No one thought it was possible: private citizens of a neutral country saving from starvation an entire nation trapped in the middle of a world war. Historian Miller has his own personal connections to the story of the WWI Crusaders, August 1914 to May 1917, and plans WWI CRUSADERS as part one of a three-part series.


Question Time with Public Figures


The American public expects public officials to deal with, rather than dodge, difficult public-policy problems, to be transparent in their public-policy positions, and to state their views confidently, thoughtfully and boldly.  One week was allowed to finalize the response, by E-mail, of each of the Presidential candidates listed below.
The Continental News Service had announced its intention to publish results of this multi-respondent poll in its on-line newspapers over the course of time, and these newspapers include its Washington D.C. News Edition, Chicago News Edition, Honolulu News Edition, Atlanta News Edition, Anchorage News Edition, Boston News Edition, Seattle News Edition, Miami News Edition, San Diego News Edition, Rochester (N.Y.) News Edition, Minneapolis News Edition, and Houston News Edition.

Would you, Senator/Representative/Governor, support  legislation, or even sponsor legislation, ending all federal government grants to Planned Parenthood if it was conducted in an even-handed and non-discriminatory manner; that is, likewise ending all federal and federally-subsidized state grants to faith-based and all other non-profit groups,  whatever their specific tax-code classification?
 __ Yes.  Uncheck "No Comment."  My reasoning is ________________________________________________________________________________.
 __ No.  Uncheck "No Comment."  My reasoning is _________________________________________________________________________________.
 X No Comment.  Senator Kamala Harris, Senator Cory Booker, Senator Bernie Sanders, Senator Elizabeth Warren, Representative Tulsi Gabbard, Washington Governor Jay Inslee.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

* Proverbs (chapter 28/verse 22): “He that hastes to be rich has an evil eye, and considers not that poverty shall come upon him.”   hastes=hurries.

[A timely warning against get-rich-quick schemes]

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A free copy of the Etna, California News Edition of Continental Newstime [dated August 14, 2020] containing the newspaper feature of outdoor writer Lee Snyder is also available by

E-mail request ​to info@continentalnewsservice.com


*Free


Tulelake, CA News Edition 

of Continental Newstime  newsmagazine

VOLUME I                                            NUMBER 1                                   OCTOBER 12, 2020
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                                                                                                                                                  What's new in Tulelake, California? Find out here:
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This is a Special Issue designed only to encourage a would-be editor-publisher in Tulelake, California to start a regular weekly or bi-weekly newspaper and to show that, using the structured format below, the proverbial wheel need not be re-invented—to eliminate the complexity in restoring newspaper coverage to Tulelake, California.  Just as our Website indicates, Continental Features/Continental News Service is available to give guidance, to offer some cartoons/comic strips and other feature material free of charge, and to help a new local editor-publisher expand by 26 pages one time monthly for readers interested in receiving a general-interest magazine insert. CF/CNS desires more exposure for our cartoons, comic strips and newspaper columns, but we do not exist to compete with a local editor-publisher in Tulelake, California.  We publish too many other newspapers and publications to regularly publish a Tulelake community newspaper, too.  It is our hope, besides, that a local editor-publisher in Tulelake will not neglect to publish ads, so local businesses receive wider publicity for their products and services.  Thank you.


Tulelake, CA News Edition of Continental Newstime 
Continental Features/Continental News Service 
501 W. Broadway, Plaza A, PMB# 265 
San Diego, CA 92101 
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E-mail:  info@continentalnewsservice.com  


* Congressional News Briefs …  The Paycheck Protection Program ended on August 8, with about $135 billion in Program reserves unspent, and Tulelake’s agent in the U.S. House of Representatives, Doug LaMalfa, considering the initiative a success, insofar as it reportedly preserved about 51 million jobs--12 million of which were located in rural areas--has signed a petition requiring 218 House Member signatures, to bring this matter up for consideration on the House floor.  The thrust of the associated bill, House bill 8265, is to qualify businesses for a second Program loan if they can show a reduction in revenue, to relax spending requirements, and to enable businesses--Congressman LaMalfa has small Northern California businesses in mind--to claim loan forgiveness.  LaMalfa expresses disappointment that, as more businesses close for good and could make use of the already-authorized aid, amid an active wildfire season, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has blocked Congress from addressing small-business needs.  Also, the California Representative informs that he helped draft legislation the House passed to revise the 2018 Water Resources Development Act to offer relief to Klamath Basin farmers and ranchers that suffered water shutoffs threatening to the Basin economy.  The bill permits the Bureau of Reclamation to earmark as much as $10 million annually for conservation and water-efficiency measures and authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to exercise greater flexibility in meeting the needs of water users and to protect duck populations in the Klamath National Wildlife Refuge from drought, as well.  Since the U.S. Senate has already passed the bill, LaMalfa trusts that, President Donald Trump, given his commitment to aiding Basin farmers and ranchers, will  sign the bill into law.  Commenting on House Bill 925, a $2.4-trillion, supposed coronavirus-spending package, which he characterizes as the Speaker's "partisan wish list" because it was written without opportunity for Republican participation and contains much irrelevant to the coronavirus, Congressman LaMalfa says his vote against the proposal owed, in part, to the Democrat leader's attempt "to prop up the vulnerable members of her party headed into Election Day."  The GOP Congressman's objections to the bill center on its tendency "to fund dangerous programs, like letting felons out of prison, providing stimulus checks to illegal immigrants, de-funding police, and federalizing the electoral process."  In particular, he mentions removal of $600 million for COPS Hiring and state and local law-enforcement aid, opening a loophole for Planned Parenthood to receive taxpayer money under the Paycheck Protection Program, dispensing with ID requirements for in-person voting, eliminating the limitations on State and Local Tax (SALT) deductibility, and, among other demerits, stripping the Food Stamp program of its work-incentive provisions.  California Senator Dianne Feinstein, together with Virginia Senators Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, concede that, from the beginning of the Military Housing Privatization Initiative in 1996, Congress and the Defense Department expressed too much confidence in the private firms administering the program; namely, through such features as 50-year leases between the companies and the service branches.  The National Defense Authorization Act in the 2020 fiscal-year addressed health, safety and environmental hazards in the private military housing, and, in keeping with the Act, the Defense Department announced an 18-point Tenant Bill of Rights during February, 2020.  Still, the Senators note, four of the required rights have yet to be extended, since there is no standard lease, no tenant access to the housing unit's maintenance history, no mechanism for withholding the Basic Allowance for Housing when a dispute between company and tenant occurs, and no process for resolution of disputes.  Toward greater oversight by Congress and the Defense Department, the California Senator and her colleagues have introduced the Ensuring Safe Housing for Our Military Act (Senate Bill 703) and have requested a progress report on the Tenant Bill of Rights from Defense Secretary Mark Esper.  Then, too, the Senator, along with all Judiciary Committee Democrats, argue that a Senate hearing on Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett "would endanger health, safety."  They add, "Now is the time to provide much-needed COVID relief, not to rush through a Supreme Court nomination and further endanger health and safety."  In their letter to Chairman Lindsey Graham, they oppose a remote hearing on the nomination, too.

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* State Government News Briefs … Tulelake’s representative in the California Senate, Brian Dahle, has announced his opposition to a measure passed by the California Legislature that would extend and re-direct until 2051 the utility tax ratepayers now pay.  He is critical, besides, of Assembly Bill 1788, saying that the state has established many pesticide regulations, but fails to pursue those who use rodenticides and other pesticides illegally or negligently.  Moreover, remarking on Governor Gavin Newsom's long-range plan to ban gasoline-powered cars from the state's roads, he points out that the state cannot even ensure dependable electricity, much less power electric cars.  In an appraisal of the legislative session, the Governor has announced vetoing an additional 16 bills, including Assembly Bill 1835 because it would require the California Board of Education to undertake a lengthy rule-making process to amend the Local Control Funding Formula and delay use of unspent supplemental and concentration grant funds to benefit the most-vulnerable students for two school-years.  The Governor favors a January budget solution, instead.  He cited, as accomplishments, imposition of a ban on a number of toxic chemicals in cosmetic products, establishment of the state's own generic drug label (Cal Rx) as a means of lowering prescription-drug prices, creation of a task force to look into reparations for slavery, expansion of paid sick leave and family leave for front-line workers, and passage of new eviction and foreclosure-protection legislation for those confronted with a loss of housing due to the economic effects of the coronavirus.

* County Government News Briefs …  The Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors, at its meeting of October 6, was poised to take up a Consent Agenda consisting of approval of a letter to President Donald Trump asking for federal aid to counties affected by wildfire and the coronavirus public-health emergency; authorization to apply for and accept a California Library Literacy Services grant in the amount of $56,000; approval of a 2020-2021 fiscal-year contract with the First 5 Siskiyou Children & Families Commission, in an amount not greater than $30,000, to furnish mental-health services and outreach to youth aged 0 to 5; adoption of a Resolution authorizing acceptance of a CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act 2020 Emerging Issues Project allocation award of $166,978 for adjusting community-mitigation responses to the coronavirus in the County, through March 23, 2022; and, among other items, adoption of a Resolution okaying the submission of application(s) for Per Capita Grant Funds through the California Department of Parks and Recreation.  Under Departmental Requests, newly-appointed Sheriff-Coroner Jeremiah LaRue was to be sworn in, and consideration was to be given to an Urgency Ordinance amending the County Code on standards for wells, with a Public Hearing scheduled for the Second Reading of the Ordinance. With regard to appointments, County Supervisors were set to appoint one Delegate and an Alternate to serve on the California State Association of Counties Board of Directors for the 2020-2021 Association year.

* City Government News Briefs ... The City Council, at a conference-call Special Meeting on October 8, was set to take up an agenda providing for approval of the Minutes of its Special Meeting on September 15 and its Regular Meeting on that date, along with approval of bill payments,  and to receive public comments. [The Regular Meeting on September 15 dealt with the matter of authorization to apply for a LEAP (Local Early Action Planning) grant in the amount of $65,000 for re-zoning, updating planning documents, ordinances, and housing elements before the January 31, 2021 deadline; consideration of a possible change of ownership to the City of the Clyde Hotel and associated grant opportunities; possible acceptance of a construction bid on the Veterans Park Expansion Project; and, among other items of business, approval of a contract for on-call  Engineering Services. The Special Meeting took up the matter of Police Officer appointments in Closed Session and considered approval of a professional-services agreement with Jesse Small to perform artistic services in connection with the Veterans Park Expansion Project.]  In addition, time was scheduled for delivery of reports from community and/or school representatives; for authorization to pursue funding to cover the deficiency preventing initiation of the Veterans Park Expansion Project; for discussion, toward approval, of the proposed valued engineering contract suggested by the Director of Public Works;  and for permission for the City Hall Administrator to advertise for the Temporary City Staff/Library position.  The subsequent Closed Session of the Council, over which Mayor Henry Ebinger was to preside, was tasked to discuss a citizen complaint against the City Hall Administrator concerning payment of a utility bill and  cumulative fees, while a succeeding Closed Council Session was concerned with Performance Evaluations of all City Department Heads.  Thereafter, Department Heads were allotted time to furnish updates on matters relating to their areas of responsibility, and comments from such City officials as the City Engineer, the Chief of Police, the Director of Public Works, the City Clerk, the City Treasurer, and Council Members (Gary Fensler, Richard Marcillac, Penny Velador, and Henry Ebinger) were entertained.

* Weather ...  The National Weather Service reports that, as of 1:05 AM, current conditions at Klamath Falls International Airport are mostly cloudy, with a temperature of 48 degrees Fahrenheit, relative humidity of 70 percent, wind out of the south at 6 miles per hour, barometric pressure of 30.23 inches, a dewpoint of 39 degrees, and visibility of 10 miles.  The over-night forecast for Tulelake calls for partly-cloudy skies, with a light west wind and a low temperature of about 33 degrees.  Columbus Day is expected to be mostly sunny, with light and variable wind becoming westerly at 6 to 11 miles per hour in the afternoon and with a daily high temperature of about 64 degrees.  Monday night is expected to be mostly clear, with a low temperature of about 33 degrees and west-northwest wind of 5 to 10 miles per hour becoming light and variable in the evening, while the forecast for Tuesday calls for mostly-sunny skies, a daily high temperature near 70 degrees, and light and variable wind becoming westerly at 5 to 10 miles per hour in the afternoon.  

 

 

 

                                                                                   Please E-mail info@continentalnewsservice.com for a copy of Cliff Ulmer's cartoon feature, Brother Jones.

 

 

 

 


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VOLUME VII          NUMBER 1          OCTOBER 1, 2020

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